Thanksgiving Slaw

Coleslaw is something I’ve never enjoyed; it took me until my late twenties to realize I really just didn’t enjoy the mayo-based versions. Shredded cabbage or other veggies in a lighter dressing is just a salad that’s easier to eat, but in my opinion mayo is not intended to be the focal flavor of a dish. (Cue Midwest outcry.) If you disagree, that’s just fine, but I hope you’ll still give this non-mayo coleslaw a try.

Thanksgiving Slaw {{Baking Bytes}}

A few months ago when my mom visited, we took a cooking class from Olivelle. The one that happened to fit with our schedule was a paleo menu, and even though neither of us are paleo I figured the menu sounded great and Olivelle has yet to disappoint me, so we gave it a whirl. As it turned out, it was one of my favorite classes to date (I’ve done…several…) and I loved every single recipe on the menu.

One of those recipes was a Brussels sprouts slaw. I don’t usually care for cruciferous vegetables in their raw state, but somehow after being shredded with cabbage and toasted pecans, folded with blueberries, and lightly coated in a fruity balsamic dressing, I was in love. Not only is this one of the few class recipes I’ve gotten around to making on my own, but I’ve made it three times since August despite having to borrow a food processor eat time.

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Since it’s vegan, paleo, gluten-free and pretty much every-diet-ever friendly, this is a wonderful dish to take to potlucks and gatherings. Even better, it’s great chilled but just fine at room temperature, and best when made ahead, giving you all the time to relax and actually enjoy the party. It also makes a great lunch alongside your protein of choice if you’re fortunate enough to have leftovers. As a bonus, the green sprouts contrast nicely with the purple of the cabbage and the red pomegranate seeds, making it aesthetically pleasing in addition to its fantastic flavors.

I made a few tweaks for an autumn version, resulting in a perfect Thanksgiving side that doesn’t need oven space, and/or a healthy addition to Christmas that maybe even the kids will enjoy. (No guarantees, this recipe was not tested on children.) The Brussels and cabbage base remains, but I opted for walnuts since I prefer them over pecans, and pomegranate seeds for their color and tartness. I 100% cheated and bought a container of seeds, but if you want to get in your work out and seed a pomegranate then by all means, please do so.

Thanksgiving Slaw {{Baking Bytes}}

The dressing is a lovely mix of Olivelle products, so if you’ve not jumped on their bandwagon for some reason then now (or actually, Black Friday) is the time to make the leap. If you’re still not ready, a substitution of regular olive oil and white balsamic vinegar with some splashes of blood orange and pomegranate juices might work out, but I have not tested it. (If you go this route and you like the result, share your recipe in the comments!)

Thanksgiving Slaw {{Baking Bytes}}

If you’re in the market for a healthy but different addition to your holiday table, and cannot stomach the thought of putting yet another dish in the oven, this is the recipe for you.

Thanksgiving Slaw

Adapted from Olivelle
Serves 6

Ingredients

1 lbs Brussels sprouts
1/2 small head red cabbage
1 cup walnuts (or nut of choice)
1 cup pomegranate seeds

dressing
1/3 cup Olivelle Harvest Fig or Vanilla Pomegranate Balsamic Vinegar(Or a mix of both!)
1/3 cup Olivelle Blood Orange Olive Oil1
1 Tbsp lime juice
1 tsp Olivelle Vanilla Bean Sea Salt (or regular salt)

Directions

  1. Use a food processor (or a grater and a lot of patience) to shred the sprouts and cabbage. (If you’re a novice at food processing, this works best if you do it in relatively small batches.) Add both to a large mixing bowl.
  2. Coarsely chop walnuts (by hand, or with the food processor). Add to a dry pan and toast lightly over medium heat until fragrant. (Or skip this step if you’re lazy or in a hurry – it’ll still be good just a slightly different nuttiness flavor.)
  3. Combine all dressing ingredients in a jar and shake vigorously until well mixed. Taste for flavor preferences, and adjust if necessary.
  4. Pour over the sprouts and cabbage and stir with a rubber scraper until well coated.
  5. Fold in toasted nuts and pomegranate seeds.
  6. Store in the fridge until ready to serve – overnight is better – then enjoy chilled or at room temperature. Will keep for at least five days in the fridge.

Notes

If you have not purchased the entire Olivelle store, a substitution of 1/4 cup olive oil, 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar, and pomegranate + blood orange juice to taste might work. This is an untested substitution so let me know if you try it!

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Savory Cocoa Stout Bread

Hello friends – can you believe it’s already the last week of October? As usual autumn has flown by and also as usual, Montana doesn’t care that I’m not ready to have snow in the forecast every day this week. Fortunately, M got my winter bike all prepped for me so if the snow does stick at least I am physically prepared even if I am emotionally reluctant.

Savory Cocoa Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

To round out this Oktobeerbreadfest series, this last one is another savory take on a typically sweet palate. Chocolate is an extremely versatile flavor and despite its tendency towards use in sweet recipes, it can add an intriguing depth to savory varieties. A dash of cocoa in your chili can take it to a whole new level – and no, it won’t taste like a brownie. Like vanilla, chocolate is not sweet until you add sugar and so it can be even more interesting in your entrees than in your desserts. My recent love affair with Olivelle’s Vanilla Bean Sea Salt has me adding it to a number of fall veggies like squash and beets and trust me, it’s delightful.

Savory Cocoa Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

On that note, this is a chocolate bread not in the way you think of a sweet bread, but more in the way that beer and wine is described as having notes of chocolate in the flavor. (Except with recipe this it’s not a lie – you can actually taste the cocoa.) The addition is  subtle in flavor but adds just a little something extra to every bite.

Savory Cocoa Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

The small amount of cocoa also deepens the coloring of the bread, resulting in a rich and rustic brown. Obviously this isn’t something that matters to everyone, but for those of us that know you do eat prettiness, it’s a happy side effect.

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This bread blends just as well with peanut butter as it does your favorite stew, making it an easy staple to keep around. I haven’t tried it (yet), but I have a hunch it would make some pretty fun French toast as well. Whether the other breads in the series spoke to you or not, I hope you give this one a try.

Savory Cocoa Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

PS – Isn’t this cutting board beautiful? M’s grandparents gifted it to us when we visited last Christmas and I am loving it as a fall background for my photos!

Savory Cocoa Stout Bread

Makes one standard loaf

Ingredients

1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/2 cup white flour
2 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1-2 Tbsp brown sugar
4 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt

12 oz chocolate/coffee stout (I used Obsidian Stout)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together all dry ingredients to remove lumps.
  3. Pour in stout and stir until just combined.
  4. Spread evenly into prepared pan, smoothing the top as best you can.
  5. Bake 50-60 minutes, or until nicely browned and a toothpick comes out clean.
  6. Perfect for toast or alongside stew. (And I haven’t tried it yet, but I would bet it’d be great as French toast, too.)

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread

In the onslaught of pumpkin recipes that is autumn, there always seems to be a vast majority of them leaning sweet. Excepting the occasional soup, pasta, or chili, nearly all recipes (and certainly most of the baked goods) play with the sweet side of pumpkin’s uses. While I love a sweet pumpkin bread as much as the next girl, I was intrigued with the idea of going savory.

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Much like the other breads, a few tweaks to the standard recipe resulted in just what I was going for. Definitely savory and with a prominent beer flavor, this one has gentle notes of pumpkin and sage that work well on their own or will pair nicely with your favorite fall chili.

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

In addition to the subtle flavor change, the pumpkin adds a little moistness to the finished product. Lightly toasted, it works beautiful with butter or a spread, or to dip into soup. The savory beer flavor would be a lovely complement to a slightly sweeter squash soup, or make your chili extra hearty.

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

The pumpkin-ness of this bread will depend largely on your choice of beer rather than the amount of puree. I made this recipe twice with the same pumpkin beer and the results were only vaguely different. On the plus side, it makes it a great recipe to use up leftover pumpkin, but on the downside it means you need to choose your beer wisely. As someone that doesn’t actually consume beer in its beverage form, I don’t have a lot of experience in beer picking, but the particular beer I chose was not hugely pumpkin flavored on its own. Choosing one that that is heavier on the pumpkin aspect would likely result in a stronger flavor within the bread.

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

 

I opted to top my bread with a sprinkling of pumpkin seeds. This is largely for show (the pictures are way prettier, amirite?) but it also adds a nice crunch and gives some expectation as to what the bread flavor might be.

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

If, like me, you get burned out on the overwhelming amount of sweet pumpkin recipes, tone it down several notches and make a cozy loaf of bread.

Savory Pumpkin & Sage Beer Bread

Makes one standard loaf

Ingredients

1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/2 cup white flour
2 Tbsp brown sugar1
4 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup fresh sage, finely chopped

12 oz pumpkin beer
1/2 – 1 cup pumpkin puree1

Garnish, optional
1 Tbsp raw pumpkin seeds
1/2 tsp olive oil
1/4 tsp dried sage
pinch of salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together remaining dry ingredients to remove lumps.
  3. Pour in beer and stir until just combined.
  4. Spread evenly into prepared pan. If desired, mix together seeds, oil, and sage until seeds are coated, and sprinkle on top of the batter.
  5. Bake 50-60 minutes, or until nicely browned and a toothpick comes out clean.
  6. Perfect for toast or to accompany your favorite fall dinners.

Notes

There is not a great difference in flavor with this range, so just use whatever amount of pumpkin you need to use up. The larger amount results in a slightly more moist bread but that is the only noticeable difference.

If you do want a little sweeter bread, add up to 1/3 cup of brown sugar.

Oatmeal² Stout Bread

As much as I love getting creative with flavors and mix-ins, it’s also helpful to have a neutral bread that goes with almost anything. This recipe is for that category.

Oats are a staple in our house. M eats oatmeal every morning and it’s a regular option in my own diet in the winter as well. They find their way into cookies, bars, pancakes, muffins, smoothies, and breads for an easy change in texture and flavor without it being overwhelmingly different. Since oatmeal stout is a fairly common beer, combining it with the addition of actual oats seemed a no brainer.

Oatmeal Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

This bread combines a savory but neutral flavor, a lovely brown color, and a hearty texture into a delightfully rustic experience. Although reminiscent of the brown bread at Outback Steakhouse, it is less sweet and a totally different mouthfeel given the quick bread style instead of yeast. Regardless, it will pair beautifully with almost anything, from steak and potatoes to soups and stews to breakfast toast and lunchtime sandwiches. It is exceptionally delicious when lightly toasted (as I do with all my beer breads), and it will work with a variety of toppings depending on your mood or the rest of the meal.

Oatmeal Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Keep it savory by ditching the sugar entirely, or add a couple of tablespoons for just a little complement to the bitterness of the beer. Topping the bread with a couple tablespoons of whole oats adds visual interest and a little crunch from the toasted oats. It also makes it easy to differentiate from other breads if, like me, you’re making multiple loaves at once.

Oatmeal Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

If soup season has finally hit your neck of the woods, consider this bread for a dipping companion. If not, peanut butter toast might be more up your alley.

Oatmeal² Stout Bread

Makes one standard loaf

Ingredients

1 cup + 2 Tbsp old-fashioned oats, divided
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup white flour
1-2 Tbsp brown sugar (optional)
4 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt

12 oz oatmeal stout

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set aside.
  2. Use a blender or food processor to grind 1 cup of oats; leave it coarser for extra texture or do a fine ground to better match the other flours.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine ground oats, both flours, brown sugar (if desired), baking powder, and salt. Whisk together to remove lumps.
  4. Pour in stout and stir until just combined.
  5. Spread evenly into prepared pan, then top with remaining whole oats.
  6. Bake 50-60 minutes, or until nicely browned and a toothpick comes out clean.
  7. Perfect for toast or to accompany a hearty stew.

(Bacon & Cheddar) Herb Beer Bread

For week two of Oktobeerbreadfest we are going a bit more traditional. Beer, cheese, and a bacon are a lovely combination in soup form which gave me the inspiration for this bread. I added some fresh herbs (you can use dried herbs too) for something a little extra, and wound up with a bread that really shines alone, as well as being excellent to dip in tomato soup, craft a glorious grilled cheese, or serve with actual beer cheese soup.

Bacon Cheddar Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Sharp cheddar is my cheese of choice here, but any cheddar or firm cheese would do nicely. Play around with the flavors to mix and match with your entrées and sandwiches. Crumbled bacon adds an extra savory note and a bit of texture, without overpowering the bread itself. If you only want a hint of bacon, I recommend just crumbling a slice or two on top of the loaf (before baking) rather than folding it into the batter itself.

Bacon Cheddar Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Vegetarian or just not into bacon? Stick to just cheese and herbs and you’ll still wind up with something amazing. Vegan? Herb beer bread is excellent as well, or try your favorite vegan cheese substitute (and let me know how it turns out!)

Cheddar Herb Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Extra cheddar and/or bacon will result in a grilled cheese for the ages; optionally, pair with a bottle of the beer you used in the bread to bring the whole meal together. For breakfast, top with a poached egg and extra herbs and you are good to go.

Bacon Cheddar Beer Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

 

Regardless of the variation(s) you try, this bread is a super easy way to get that cheesey, bready, goodness without needing the patience for yeast. Let me know your favorite combinations!

(Bacon & Cheddar) Herb Beer Bread

Makes one standard loaf

Ingredients

1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/2 cup white flour
4 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp dried herbs (I used a mix of basil and chive)

12 oz beer
4 oz sharp cheddar, coarsely grated
2-4 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine dry ingredients and whisk together to remove lumps.
  3. Pour in beer and stir until just combined.
  4. Fold in cheddar and bacon, if using.
  5. Spread evenly into prepared pan, then top with remaining oats.
  6. Bake 50-60 minutes, or until nicely browned and a toothpick comes out clean.
  7. Cool on the counter about 10 minutes, then remove to a wire rack to cool completely.
  8. Serve with butter, either solo or alongside your favorite chili.

Notes

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