Rhubarbamom Crisp Ice Cream

Week four already! Is it just me or did the month fly by? For our last ice cream adventure in National Ice Cream Month, I’ve saved my favorite of this year’s collection.

Rhubarbamom Crisp Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

I had actually set out to make another recipe (which I may still revisit another time), but lost motivation with that one after coming across the pairing of rhubarb and cardamom. I am a huge cardamom fan (second only to cinnamon) and I love the twist it brings to otherwise classic desserts. Rhubarb pie and crisp are two of my favorite things, and I personally prefer the filling unadulterated by an accompanying fruit. Tart rhubarb and a side of ice cream are a match made in delicious heaven, so I decided to roll the whole thing into one. Inspired in name by the Rhubarbian cocktail at Nordic Brewworks, rhubarbamom crisp ice cream was born.

Rhubarbamom Crisp Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

An easy rhubarb cardamom compote is the major component of this particular ice cream. Smooth, tart, and just a little spicy, it would be just as great on toast or pancakes as it is swirled into this creamy dessert. It’s also an excellent way to use up last year’s rhubarb to make room for this year’s new crop.

I mixed my standard ice cream base with a generous amount of compote, choosing not to add additional sugar. This results in a lovely tart finish, but does have the side effect of the ice cream freezing rather harder than usual. You can definitely increase the sugar if you prefer a sweeter dessert or simply want to be able to enjoy the finished product straight out of the freezer.

Rhubarbamom Crisp Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

To accompany the creamy ice cream and tart compote, I baked a small batch of oatmeal crisp topping. Baked slightly crispier than you might prefer solo, it softens slightly amidst the ice cream into the perfect crunchy and creamy combination. It’s addicting on its own so do your best not to eat all straight off the pan while it cools.

rhubarbamo_crisp_ice_cream_4

After the ice cream churns, you’ll layer it into the container with extra compote and the crumbled topping before freezing. The pretty swirl and crispy oatmeal found in every bite are not only visually pleasing, but superbly delicious. If desired, top with a dollop of addition compote and crisp, and enjoy as the perfect end to a hot summer day.

Rhubarbamom Crisp Ice Cream

Makes about 6 cups

Ingredients

2 cups heavy whipping cream
2 cups rhubarb cardamom compote, divided (below)
1 cup half and half
1/2 cup egg beaters
1/4 cup sugar, optional1
1 cup oatmeal crisp topping (below)

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together cream, half and half, egg beaters, and 1 1/2 cups rhubarb cardamom compote. Taste, and add sugar if desired.
  2. Chill until completely cooled, at least four fours. Place a freezer-safe bowl into your freezer.
  3. Freeze mixture according to your ice cream maker’s directions.
  4. Spoon 1/4 of the mixture into your chilled container. Drizzle with a spoonful of additional rhubarb cardamom compote and 1/4 cup oatmeal crisp topping.
  5. Repeat layers with remaining ice cream, then freeze until firm.
  6. Soften on the counter for about 20 minutes prior to serving.

Notes

I personally did not add more sugar because I like my rhubarb desserts to be quite tart. If you prefer a sweeter experience or don’t want the ice cream to freeze quite so hard, add the extra amount.

Rhubarb Cardamom Compote

Makes about 2 cups

Ingredients

4 cups frozen rhubarb, thawed and drained
1 cup sugar
1 tsp lemon juice
6-10 cardamom pods, seeded
1/2 tsp cinnamon

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine all ingredients.
  2. Heat over medium, stirring often, until rhubarb is softened and breaks apart.
  3. Use an immersion blender to puree the compote until smooth.
  4. Let cool on the counter briefly, then store in the refrigerator until ready to use.

Notes

Words

Oatmeal Crisp Topping

Makes about 2 cups

Ingredients

1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup old-fashioned oats (not quick oats)
1/2 cup brown sugar (not packed)
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder

1/2 cup butter, cold

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a baking sheet with a silicon mat or parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients.
  3. Use a box grater to grate cold butter directly into the bowl (or dice it by hand and add it).
  4. Mix together with your hands, mashing the butter into the flour mixture until well combined.
  5. Crumble onto prepared baking sheet, then bake 10-15 minutes or until lightly browned.
  6. Let cool completely, then crumble into an airtight container and store on the counter until ready to use.

Protein Porridge

Happy 2019, folks. I hope everyone had a wonderful year, but if not, I hope this coming one is everything you hoped 2018 would be. I am not much of a resolution setter, but I am a huge fan of goals and personal challenges, and also a numbers person. Last year I tried 76 new recipes, shared 36 posts with you lovely readers, started an Instagram, tried and liked a lower carb lifestyle, discovered the magic that is a spiralizer, and went to several difference food-related classes and events, including learning how to make vodka infusions and homemade sausage. I am looking forward to putting those last two things to good use this year, and sharing them with all of you.

One of my December challenges was to keep a food log, in which I write down all the things I eat every day. It’s an analog version so obviously not a calorie tracker, but it makes me stop and think before eating and helps me to choose healthier options, especially during the food cluster that is the holiday season. I feel very successful this year, navigating lots of deliciousness in healthy ways without feeling like I deprived myself of seasonal treats.  Whether, like me, you are looking to maintain a good thing, or perhaps to start anew, this easy peasy breakfast is a great way to start the day.

Protein Porridge {{Baking Bytes}}

In August when I went lower carb, I basically stopped eating my go-to breakfast of banana peanut butter oatmeal. Since it would’ve been half my carbs for the day, I opted for yogurt parfait and chia pudding and probably unhealthy amounts of eggs. As the weather cooled, however, I found myself missing my warm bowl of morning oats even more. I am no longer tracking my macros, but I’m still opting to do lower carb and higher protein whenever possible, so I set out to find an appropriate winter option. Patterning off my summer recipes, I kept the chia and hemp I’ve become accustomed to and added a few oats for volume. Quick oats work best since the hemp and chia don’t need much time to cook, but lightly blended old-fashioned oats works great too. (I tried it once without grinding them and didn’t care for the textural juxtaposition, but you can nix the grinding process if you don’t mind it.) Warm, cozy, filling, and even faster at cooking, this is my new favorite way to start a chilly morning.

Protein Porridge {{Baking Bytes}}

Even without the boosts this recipe has about 12 grams of protein, but I nearly double that with peanut butter powder and/or protein powder. I personally like the peanut butter powder best since it doesn’t affect the texture and adds a nice peanuty flavor with less fat than regular peanut butter (of which there is already plenty from the hemp and chia). You can use up to 1/4 cup depending on your calorie needs, although I typically use two tablespoons. Alternatively, you can use your favorite protein powder. This is a great option if you’re allergic peanuts or using mix-ins that aren’t typically paired with peanut flavor. Don’t add more than two tablespoons though (about half a scoop), because the resulting texture will be noticeably grainy and a little strange.

Protein Porridge {{Baking Bytes}}

Shockingly (jokes), my go-to mix-ins are half a banana and cinnamon, which pairs nicely with my peanut butter powder. Most fruits are great for this, and it’s a good way to use frozen produce as well. Just heat the produce first and then mix in the rest of the ingredients. If you’re not a peanut butter person (weird), I’ve listed a few other varieties that are excellent with or without protein powder. I also typically stir in a little plain yogurt to add that creaminess, or just actual heavy cream when I’m feeling more decadent. You can 100% skip this if you are dairy-free, or use your favorite non-dairy substitute. Although I don’t usually add it, a teaspoon or two of maple syrup is a nice addition for the more tart berries or options like pumpkin that are not inherently sweet.

Protein Porridge {{Baking Bytes}}

You can easily mix together all the dry ingredients in individual portions, then just add your mix-ins and water and you’re ready to go. I like to prep mine in 8oz containers so I can use it to measure the appropriate amount of water if I’m not at home. Additionally, nix the fruit entirely (but maybe up the spices) for a camping-friendly instant porridge that just requires hot water.

Get your protein in a cozy porridge and start your morning warm and happy. Give it a try and share your favorite mix-ins in the comments!

Protein Porridge

makes one serving

Ingredients

basic porridge
1/4 cup quick oats1
2 Tbsp chia seeds
2 Tbsp hemp seeds
2-4 Tbsp peanut butter powder OR 1 Tbsp natural peanut butter (optional)
2 Tbsp protein powder (optional)
6-8 oz water

2 Tbsp plain Greek yogurt OR 1/2 Tbsp heavy cream (optional)
1 tsp maple syrup (optional)

flavor ideas with peanut butter
1/2 banana, mashed + 1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/2 cup blueberries, mashed + 1/8 tsp cardamom

flavor ideas without peanut butter
1/2 cup peaches, mashed + 1/4 tsp cinnamon + pinch of nutmeg
1/2 cup pumpkin puree + 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut + coconut cream instead of yogurt

Directions

  1. If using fruit, mash it into the bottle of a microwaveable bowl.
  2. Add oats, seeds, peanut butter, protein powder (if using), spices of choice, and water. Stir until well combined.
  3. Microwave on high for about 2-3 minutes (2:20 in my microwave is just how I like it) OR use boiling water and let sit, covered, until thickened.
  4. Stir in yogurt and/or maple syrup, if desired.
  5. Enjoy immediately.

Notes

You can also use 1/4 cup old-fashioned oats, lightly ground in a blender. I often do this method since we always have regular oatmeal on the counter for M. Also, if you are gluten-free, use certified oats to keep this recipe up to par.

Oatmeal² Stout Bread

As much as I love getting creative with flavors and mix-ins, it’s also helpful to have a neutral bread that goes with almost anything. This recipe is for that category.

Oats are a staple in our house. M eats oatmeal every morning and it’s a regular option in my own diet in the winter as well. They find their way into cookies, bars, pancakes, muffins, smoothies, and breads for an easy change in texture and flavor without it being overwhelmingly different. Since oatmeal stout is a fairly common beer, combining it with the addition of actual oats seemed a no brainer.

Oatmeal Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

This bread combines a savory but neutral flavor, a lovely brown color, and a hearty texture into a delightfully rustic experience. Although reminiscent of the brown bread at Outback Steakhouse, it is less sweet and a totally different mouthfeel given the quick bread style instead of yeast. Regardless, it will pair beautifully with almost anything, from steak and potatoes to soups and stews to breakfast toast and lunchtime sandwiches. It is exceptionally delicious when lightly toasted (as I do with all my beer breads), and it will work with a variety of toppings depending on your mood or the rest of the meal.

Oatmeal Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Keep it savory by ditching the sugar entirely, or add a couple of tablespoons for just a little complement to the bitterness of the beer. Topping the bread with a couple tablespoons of whole oats adds visual interest and a little crunch from the toasted oats. It also makes it easy to differentiate from other breads if, like me, you’re making multiple loaves at once.

Oatmeal Stout Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

If soup season has finally hit your neck of the woods, consider this bread for a dipping companion. If not, peanut butter toast might be more up your alley.

Oatmeal² Stout Bread

Makes one standard loaf

Ingredients

1 cup + 2 Tbsp old-fashioned oats, divided
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup white flour
1-2 Tbsp brown sugar (optional)
4 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt

12 oz oatmeal stout

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set aside.
  2. Use a blender or food processor to grind 1 cup of oats; leave it coarser for extra texture or do a fine ground to better match the other flours.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine ground oats, both flours, brown sugar (if desired), baking powder, and salt. Whisk together to remove lumps.
  4. Pour in stout and stir until just combined.
  5. Spread evenly into prepared pan, then top with remaining whole oats.
  6. Bake 50-60 minutes, or until nicely browned and a toothpick comes out clean.
  7. Perfect for toast or to accompany a hearty stew.

Oatmeal Peanut Butter M&M Cookies

January is often a time for change; new diets, new fitness routines, new personal and professional goals. I am no exception to this rule, but this year I have a slightly different goal in mind with regards to my eating and this blog.

Off and on I’ve struggled with healthy eating, to the point that it’s been hard to feel good about eating anything that isn’t a plain vegetable. We are so inundated by “guilt-free” and “skinny” and “clean-eating” recipes that it starts to feel like every food is measured by how terrible of a person I am for eating it. This year, I’m done with that. Fat is not the enemy, carbs are not the enemy, and if I’m going to eat dessert then why the heck would I want it to be “skinny” or “light”. If you see me using these phrases here, please point them out. I know that changing my relationship with ingredients is not a one-woman task, and if you want to join me in this endeavor, I welcome all the help I can get.

In light of that, here is an extremely normal cookie recipe because if you’re going to have a cookie, have a proper cookie. (Those “skinny” recipes never work anyway, since most of the time people just eat twice as many of them.) Peanut buttery goodness complemented with the rustic flavor of oatmeal and the chocolatey crunch of peanut butter M&M’s, these are sure to please any peanut butter fan.

I’ve been making the standard peanut butter cookie recipe on the back of the Jif jar for as long as I can remember (even saving a label when my Costco started carrying Skippy instead), and it’s still one of my favorites. I usually add chocolate chips (and nix the sugar crosshatching) because nothing is better than melty chocolate and soft peanut butter cookie in one cozy mouthful. However, I also super love oatmeal cookies, and have featured a couple different ones on this site. Inspired by that flavor palate, I opted to adapt this recipe towards some oatmealy delight.

Largely the same as the original, I substituted some of the flour for some extra oatmeal mostly for texture purposes. I never pack brown sugar for cookie recipes, which I think blends nicely for the oatmeal pairing, but if you prefer a sweeter flavor then by all means pack that sugar firmly into your measuring cups.

For texture and color and always-welcomed chocolate, peanut M&M’s are a fun addition. I’ve also used peanut butter M&M’s and regular ole’ chocolate chunks, both with delicious success. Smooth peanut butter is my preference, but use chunky or add some chopped roasted peanuts if you’re in to that. Playing up the peanut flavor instead of just sugar is a nice twist on an old favorite, and it makes them great for hiking too.

Celebrate your progress towards your first month of goals, console yourself over the lack thereof, or just welcome in a new month with a batch of these cookies. Enjoying life is so much more than doing everything “right”, and a proper cookie is always a welcome lift in the day.

Oatmeal Peanut Butter M&M Cookies

Adapted from Jif
Makes about 3 dozen large cookies

Ingredients

3 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups old-fashioned oats
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 1/2 cup peanut butter (Jif or similar; I’ve never tried it with a “natural” sort)
1 cup shortening
2 1/2 cups unpacked light brown sugar
6 tablespoons milk
2 tablespoons vanilla extract

2 eggs

3 cups peanut M&Ms1

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or silicon baking mat. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, oats, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine peanut butter, shortening, sugar, milk, and vanilla. Beat until completely combined.
  4. Add eggs and beat until just combined.
  5. Stir in flour mixture until combined. Dough should not stick to your finger if you press it; add additional flour 1/4 cup at a time if necessary.
  6. By hand, stir in M&Ms (so they don’t break.)
  7. Use a 1/4 cup cookie scoop to add balls of dough to cookie sheets (I could only fit about 8 on a pan), flattening the tops slightly.
  8. Bake 13-15 minutes, or until bottoms are lightly browned; remove to a cooling rack to cool completely.
  9. Store in an airtight container up to one week, or in the freezer for longer term storage.

Notes

Or any one of the following: peanut butter M&M’s, regular M&M’s, chocolate chunks, chocolate chips, roasted peanuts, etc. Mix and match to your heart’s desire.

Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal

Oatmeal is my go-to breakfast for all but the hottest months of summer, and somehow I rarely get tired of it. My default is peanut butter and banana with copious amounts of cinnamon, but depending on the season and produce availability I’ll occasionally concoct new flavors. As a huge fan of pumpkin pie, blending that flavor into my morning meal seemed an obvious advancement.

I always buy pumpkin puree from Costco, in those delightful 3-packs of 29oz cans, which typically leaves me with some leftovers after making whatever recipe for which I’ve opened the can. Oatmeal is a great way to use up leftovers but also an excellent reason to open a brand new can. All the cozy feelings of pumpkin pie in a much healthier version to start your day.

I opted to complement the pumpkiny goodness with a homemade pumpkin spice mix, but you can absolutely substitute a store-bought pumpkin pie spice if you prefer. With my cinnamon obsession I like to tailor mine a bit more cinnamon heavy, and mixing up your own allows you to kick up or tone down the individual spices to suit your preferences. If you do use the store-bought version, I *highly* recommend twisting a tiny amount of freshly ground pepper into each bowl, as it really adds a little extra something. I patterned this off of my favorite pumpkin pie recipe, and I now consider it a necessity in all things pumpkin.

For protein boost, I stir in chia seeds and chopped walnuts, but these are completely optional additions. If you’re more of a pecan person, use those instead. Since pumpkin is not sweet on its own, a little maple syrup brings out the pie flavor we all know and love. I keep my oatmeal fairly low on the sugar content, but no judgement if you want extra maple syrup stirred in or drizzled on top.

The final touch is a dollop of heavy cream; this is non-negotiable in my personal opinion, as it really improves the texture, adds a wonderful creaminess, and balances the whole flavor profile. Half and half could be substituted in a pinch, but the heavy cream is the more delicious option. A single tablespoon won’t hurt you, as fat and protein are both things your body needs. (If you are vegan, you could probably substitute full-fat coconut milk, or whatever your favorite cream replacement might be. You *can* just leave it out, but it’s really better with something creamy stirred in.)

Start your fall mornings off right with a hearty bowl of oatmeal, plus all the happiness of a pumpkin pie. (But if you prefer to start your day with the real thing, you’ll get no judgement from me.)

Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal

Makes one serving

Ingredients

pumpkin spice mix
1 T ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves
pinch of freshly ground pepper

oatmeal
1/2 cup pumpkin
1/2 cup oats
1/2 tsp pumpkin spice mix
1 T maple syrup
1-2 T chia seeds, optional
3/4 cup water
chopped walnuts, optional

1 T heavy cream (or half and half, or vegan alternative)

Directions

  1. In a small jar, combine spice ingredients. Stir or shake until well mixed.
  2. Layer pumpkin, chia, spice mix, walnuts, and oats in a microwave safe bowl.
  3. Carefully pour in water and transfer to the microwave.
  4. Microwave on medium power for 4 – 5 minutes (stirring after 1-2 minutes), or until oats are softened and desired texture is reached.
  5. Stir in maple syrup and cream, then serve immediately.

Notes

You can also substitute store-bought pumpkin pie spice, if you prefer.