Rosemary Almond Cider Bread

Is it fall where you are yet? Montana got snow on Sunday, so I guess that means it’s fall now. Hopefully the 60s of this week are not just a fluke and we have some crisp weather the rest of the month. Perfect weather for baking and soups and reading a good book. Typically October means two things: Oktoberfest and Halloween. Not being much of a fan of either, usually I ignore most of the month’s festivities in favor of prime running season. This year I’m doing both, with a half marathon this coming Sunday and a new Oktobeerbreadfest series starting today.

Rosemary Almond Cider Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

 

Despite my failure to find a beer I’ll drink solo (granted, I’ve not tried very hard), the hard cider scene is definitely my thing. We only have one cidery here in Bozeman, but there’s a few throughout the state and with Montana Cider Week slowly catching on, I decided to celebrate the first of the series with a cider bread instead of a beer bread. (For you beer bread lovers, the remaining weeks will be more your thing.)

Rosemary Almond Cider Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

You may remember some previous iterations of cider bread, as a standalone and part of my grilled cheese series this spring. This particular recipe is closer to the latter, in that I wanted to keep it as savory as possible. With the seasons usually revolving around plenty of sugar, an easy and relevant but still savory bread is perfect to start your day or accompany your favorite soups. If rosemary isn’t your thing, thyme or sage would be delicious substitutions.

Rosemary Almond Cider Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

A dry cider and little to no added sugar keeps this bread pretty neutral. For a twist, I used almond flour instead of white flour. This adds a slightly nutty note and results in a vaguely more moist bread, but pairs beautifully with the apple flavor. Stirring in a grated apple and a bit of rosemary adds a little something without being overpowering. The flavors are prominent enough to stand on their own yet also delicious alongside any number of fall soups and stews, especially those with an apple note. An apple pumpkin butternut squash soup and this bread would be a match made in delicious, delicious heaven.

Rosemary Almond Cider Bread {{Baking Bytes}}

Sweet-adjacent from the almonds and apples but definitely not a sweet bread, I’m sure this one will be a fairly regular appearance in my bread adventures. Excellent as toast with butter and/or your favorite jam, or bust out some Brie for a grown-up grilled cheese. Cream cheese or chèvre with apple and turkey would also be a lovely sandwich, cold or hot.

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Sprinkled with sliced almonds and extra rosemary, this bread is as pretty as it is delicious. Celebrate cider week from the comfort of your own home with this easy and delicious bread. And check back each week this month for a brand new recipe for your fall bread needs.

Rosemary Almond Cider Bread

Makes one standard loaf

Ingredients

1 3/4 cups superfine almond flour
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
4 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 – 2 Tbsp brown sugar (optional)
2 tsp dried (whole) rosemary, plus more for garnish
1 1/2 tsp salt

1 medium apple, grated, and excess moisture squeezed out1
12 oz dry hard cider

1 Tbsp sliced almonds, to garnish (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients until the flours are no longer lumpy.
  3. Add remaining ingredients, and stir until well combined.
  4. Spread evenly into prepared pan, then top with almonds and an extra pinch of rosemary, if desired.
  5. Bake 55-60 minutes.
  6. Let cool about ten minutes in the pan, then remove to a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. Excellent solo or with your favorite soup. Store leftovers on the counter in an airtight container or wrapped in plastic wrap.

Notes

I never peel/core my apple but you can if you want. Otherwise, just wash it well and ensure there are no seeds in the pile after grating. Use a thin cloth or a couple of paper towels to squeeze out the excess moisture before adding to your bowl.

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