Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Pops

For this week’s regular post we will stick with the frozen theme, but with a somewhat healthier approach. Peanut butter and banana is one of my favorite combos, which you probably have noticed from previous posts. Similar to one of my favorite summer confections, these are reasonably healthy, easy to prepare, and a delightful addition to a hot day.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Pops {{Baking Bytes}}

Sliced bananas spaced with peanut butter, frozen, and dipped with a thin layer of chocolate, they are sweet and satisfying without having the high sugar and calorie contents of more traditional desserts. The stick makes them great for kids and fun for adults, as well as easy to serve at potlucks and barbecues. Stored in a cooler they should be just fine for a few hours during your outside gatherings even during hot weather.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Pops {{Baking Bytes}}

As an added bonus, you can easily tailor this recipe to suit your preferences and avoid boredom. If peanut butter or chocolate isn’t your style (or you are concerned for allergies), you can easily substitute almond butter, Nutella, caramel sauce, marshmallow creme, or whatever your heart desires. Drizzle the end result with white chocolate or colored candy melts to fit in with a theme, or roll in chopped nuts for a crunchy addition.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Pops {{Baking Bytes}}

My directions make 4-6 servings depending on how high you make your stacks (and how many pieces you eat), but it’s easily scaled to make a bunch at a time. A cookie sheets works great for the initial freezing, and once the chocolate layer is completely frozen you can transfer the lot to an air-tight container or Ziploc for longer term storage. In a sealed container they’ll easily keep frozen and delicious for a few weeks, assuming you haven’t eaten them all yet.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Pops {{Baking Bytes}}

Make a quick batch of these today, then check back on Friday morning for a brand new (and adults-only) ice cream recipe.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Pops

Makes 4-6 pops

Ingredients

2 medium bananas, ripe
2 Tbsp peanut butter
1/4 cup chocolate chips1
1 Tbsp coconut oil

Directions

  1. Line a plate or small cutting board with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. Peel and slice2 bananas into approximately 1/2″ pieces, discarding (eating) rounded ends. Divide into equal stacks.
  3. In a small microwave safe container, microwave peanut butter for 30 seconds. Stir until liquid and smooth. If necessary, heat in additional 10-second intervals.
  4. Gently slide bananas onto Popsicle sticks, dipping (or spooning) peanut butter onto each slice. End with an undipped piece, then carefully place onto parchment paper. You will likely not use all the peanut butter.
  5. Freeze at least two hours.
  6. In a small microwave safe container, heat chocolate chips and coconut oil for 30 seconds. Stir until smooth and completely combined. If necessary, heat in additional 10-second intervals. For ease of dipping, pour into a tall, skinny container (like a champagne flute).
  7. Dip each banana pop into the chocolate, swirling to cover completely. Gently return to parchment paper.
  8. Return to freezer for at least 30 minutes, or until ready to serve.

Notes

For a richer chocolate experience, you can double the amount of chocolate chips simply repeat steps 6-7 to produce a thicker chocolate layer.

Obviously you could skip slicing and just dip banana halves or thirds into peanut butter and then chocolate, but I like the stacks so they end up straighter and able to stand up on end, as well as a higher banana to peanut butter ratio. But if you want to go that route, I certainly won’t judge.

S’mores Ice Cream {National Ice Cream Month}

[Introducing…Frozen Friday! In honor of National Ice Cream Month, each Friday in July, starting today, I will share a new ice cream recipe, enjoy!]

I hope all my United Statesian readers had a wonderful Independence Day, and the rest of you had a wonderful regular ole Monday. I spent the last week+ in Lead, SD visiting M while he works there. We celebrated by watching Independence Day on the 3rd, and going to the Lead fireworks display on the 4th. The movie was a bit better, I must say.

As you may have guessed, I actually meant to have this posted last Friday, but between traveling and working remotely it fell by the wayside. My sincere apologies. There will be a surprise bonus post sometime this month to bring the total up to five.

S'mores Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

In any case, ice cream! Ice cream is one of my favorite things to make and play with new recipes. Partially because it’s really hard to screw it up (even if it doesn’t turn out how you wanted, it’s rarely inedible) and also because it’s one of my favorite desserts. Thinking of new flavors and tinkering with the proportions until it’s what I dreamed in my head is both rewarding and delicious. Admittedly my ice cream consumption is rather higher throughout early summer for this reason, but I consider it a sacrifice worth making. You’re welcome.

S'mores Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

We’ll kick off the month with what might be my new favorite flavor, or definitely at least Top 5: s’mores ice cream. Graham cracker ice cream swirled with homemade chocolate and marshmallow makes for a melt-in-your-mouth s’mores experience – no fire necessary. It has the added bonus of being substantially less messy to make and eat, which is a huge win in my book.

S'mores Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

The ice cream is smooth and creamy with that wonderful Graham cracker flavor. Honestly, it’s delicious all on its own and likely I’ll add it into my usual rotation even without the extras. For a cheater version, you can just top the ice cream with chocolate sauce and marshmallows without making them yourself and doing the swirl. However, I highly recommend doing the whole she-bang. All of the components are simple to make and beginner friendly, and the result is something magical.

S'mores Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

The marshmallow creme was surprisingly easy; I actually expected it to be much more complex. Much like pudding or mousse, however, it’s mostly just heating and stirring things. Not a big deal at all. I’ve always been somewhat freaked out by store-bought marshmallow creme, so having this super easy (and pretty quick) option for ice cream is fantastic. Tastes delicious and doesn’t have anything artificial in it. Yum. I used my go-to chocolate sauce recipe here, but you can substitute your own favorite if you prefer. Just make sure it’s regular chocolate sauce, and not hot fudge, as the latter will freeze too hard.

S'mores Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

Kick your summer up a notch with this s’mores ice cream, sure to be both kid- and adult-approved.

Graham Cracker Ice Cream 

Makes ~6 cups

Ingredients

2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup half and half
1/2 cup egg substitute
1-2 packages Graham crackers1
1/2 cup brown sugar

Directions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Chill contents in blender in the fridge at least 4 hours, or overnight.
  3. Blend briefly, then freeze according to your ice cream maker’s directions.
  4. Transfer to a freezer-safe bowl to freeze for an additional three hours, or overnight. Or follow s’mores ice cream recipe below.
  5. Top with additional crushed Graham crackers for some extra flair and a little crunch.

Notes

For a milder Graham cracker flavor, use just one package. For a more kapow experience, use up to two. I like a pretty strong flavor, so I use two packages minus two or three crackers that I crush separately and reserve for topping.

Fudge Ripple

Borrowed from Brown Eyed Baker
Makes 1+ cups1

Ingredients

½ cup sugar
1/3 cup light corn syrup
½ cup water
6 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder2

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan, whisk together all ingredients except vanilla. Cook over medium heat, whisking often, until the sauce comes to a low boil.
  2. Continue cooking for another 2 minutes, whisking almost continuously.
  3. Remove sauce from the heat, stir in the vanilla, and let cool in the pot for several minutes.
  4. Chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before using in ice cream.

Notes

The quantity varies a bit depending on cooking time, in my experience. I used about 1/2 cup in my ice cream and put the rest in the fridge to use later. You can also freeze it but you may need to take it out for a bit before it becomes pourable.

The original recipe calls for Dutch-processed cocoa powder but I just used Hershey’s because that’s what I always have on hand. I used one tablespoon dark cocoa powder and the rest regular.

Marshmallow Creme

Borrowed from Cooking Classy
Makes 1+ cups1

Ingredients

3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup water
1/8 tsp salt

2 egg whites
1/4 tsp cream of tartar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan, whisk together sugar, corn syrup, water, and salt over medium heat. Continue cooking, whisking occasionally, until mixture has reached 240 degrees.
  2. Meanwhile, add egg white and cream of tartar to the bowl of a stand mixer. Whip with an electric mixer (I prefer to use a handheld rather than my stand mixer for small amounts like this) on medium-high speed until mixture is fluffy and has soft peaks. If you weren’t already using your stand mixer and whisk attachment, set that up now.
  3. When sugar mixture has come to the correct temperature, remove from heat. Turn your stand mixer to low, and slowly pour hot sugar mixture down the side of the bowl into the egg whites while the mixer is running.
  4. When all the sugar mixture is added, increase speed to medium-high and whip until mixture is glossy and medium peaks form. This will take several minutes.
  5. Scrape the bowl, add vanilla, and continue to whip on medium-high until stiff peaks form.
  6. Store in an airtight container in the fridge until ready to use.

Notes

This is half the original recipe, and I still had some leftover. It keeps well in the fridge so feel free to double it and have lots of extra for toppings.

S’mores Ice Cream

Ingredients

1 recipe Graham cracker ice cream, chilled but not churned
1 recipe of fudge ripple, chilled
1 recipe of marshmallow cream

Directions

  1. If you haven’t already, place a freezer-safe bowl in the freezer.
  2. Freeze ice cream according to your ice cream maker’s directions.
  3. Transfer about 1 cup of marshmallow creme to a frosting bag or Ziploc, and snip a 1/2″ hole.
  4. Remove bowl from freezer, and drizzle some chocolate sauce on the bottom.
  5. Gently spread about one cup of ice cream into the bowl. Pipe a swirl of marshmallow creme, then drizzle chocolate sauce over the marshmallow cream. Repeat until all ice cream is used up. Tip: end with plain ice cream or just a small drizzle as it could muddle together once you add the lid.
  6. Return bowl to freezer for at least 3 hours, or until ice cream is firm. Serve solo or with additional crushed Graham crackers, marshmallow creme, and/or chocolate sauce for topping.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse

Welcome to March! I personally do not get excited for St. Patrick’s Day, but I do get excited for the Run to the Pub half marathon that precedes it. (And also my birthday.) This year the local race is not only giving us complimentary beer at the finish, which I don’t drink, but also a complimentary cupcake, which I am substantially more excited about.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse {{Baking Bytes}}

In any case, if you are not running a race that gives you “free” dessert afterwards, maybe whip up one of your own. This Baileys chocolate mousse, emphasis on the Baileys, is an easy recipe and sure to please anyone that likes Baileys. And if you don’t like Baileys, I’m not totally sure why you’d be reading this post to begin with.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse {{Baking Bytes}}

Baileys and chocolate is one of my favorite combinations and most of the times I have dinner at Anthony’s in SeaTac airport I get the same thing: the salmon burger, no tomato, followed by a serving of their Baileys chocolate mousse. I have often thought I should learn how to make my own, despite how dangerous that might be for my health, since I don’t travel through SeaTac at nighttime much anymore. Luckily I will be at the end of the this month, and you can be certain I’ll be having my usual. My aunt and traveling running buddy also gets pretty psyched about the mousse situation at Anthony’s, and she’ll be coming to Montana for the Pub run this weekend. I’m guessing she might request I have a batch of this prepared.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse {{Baking Bytes}}

Light and creamy, like eating a Baileys cloud with some chocolate thrown in. I made the recipe twice so I could figure out my own personal preference as to the Baileys and chocolate ratio. The recipe can be made more kapow with the liqueur flavor than the chocolate, or altered slightly to make it more subtle. I’ll leave it up to you to decide. It is absolutely delicious both ways, just depends on what sort of experience you’re looking for this go around. I personally preferred the lower end of the range, but it was delicious with the more in-your-face flavor as well.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse {{Baking Bytes}}

This is a great recipe to bring to a potluck, because you can easily adjust the serving size down to “finger-food” portions, or keep it larger for a sit-down dinner where yours is the only dessert. It would be super cute piped into shot glasses (bonus points if you make them out of chocolate) but works just as well for a more decadent serving size. Top with homemade whipped cream and chocolate shavings for extra points.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse {{Baking Bytes}}

I can’t say this will become a regular in the recipe rotation, mainly because I’m trying to eat healthier, but as far as desserts go it’ll definitely be a top contender.

Baileys Chocolate Mousse

Adapted from Lemon Tree Dwelling
Makes 10-12 half-cup servings

Ingredients

Mousse
1 pouch (2 tsp) unflavored gelatin
2 Tbsp cold water
1/4 cup boiling water

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder (I prefer dark)
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream, chilled

1/4-1/2 cup Baileys cream liqueur, chilled
1 tsp vanilla

Whipped Cream
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2-3/4 cup powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla

Chocolate Curls/Shavings
1/4 cup chocolate chips

Directions

  1. Place the bowl for a stand mixer (or a large mixing bowl) and its whisk attachment (or beaters for a hand-held) in the freezer for 15 minutes.
  2. Place your serving containers in the fridge to chill while you prepare the mousse.
  3. (Measure the Baileys and put it in the freezer to chill if it’s not already cold.)
  4. Sprinkle powdered gelatin over the cold water, let stand one minute, then add boiling water.
  5. Meanwhile, retrieve the chilled mixer bowl and add cocoa powder, sugar, and whipping cream. Whip on high until stiff peaks form.
  6. Reduce mixer speed to “stir” (or stop it entirely) and add the Baileys and vanilla, then gently stir the gelatin mixture to make sure it’s completely dissolved and slowly pour it into the whipped cream.
  7. Whip on low until the liquid is mostly mixed in, then increase to high until medium peaks form.
  8. Spoon or pipe into your serving dishes, then return to the fridge to chill for one hour, or until ready to serve (it keeps in the fridge a few days, but the sooner the better).
  9. Optionally, make some chocolate curls or shavings: melt chocolate chips over a double boiler (or very carefully in the microwave), and then spread thinly onto parchment paper or a silicon baking mat. Allow to cool until no longer shiny, and then use a thin plastic utensil to gently scrape it into curls. If the chocolate just mushes together, it’s not cool enough yet, but you can put it in the fridge to speed the process. If it just breaks up a lot without curling at all, it’s too cold. It’s a fine line, especially if your house is as chilly as mine, but personally I find chocolate shavings to be visually pleasing as well, so don’t worry about it too much. When you’ve curled or scraped all your chocolate, put it all into an airtight container and freeze for at least 15 minutes before handling.
  10. Shortly before serving, whip together remaining whipped cream, powdered sugar, and vanilla, until medium-stiff peaks form. Pipe or spoon onto your mousse.
  11. Optionally, top with your chocolate curls or other sprinkles.
  12. Serve immediately or return to the fridge for up to a couple of hours (the stiffer your whipped cream started, the longer it will keep).

Grandma’s Chocolate Fudge

Grandma's Chocolate Fudge {{Baking Bytes}}

As we carry on through December, I imagine many people are working on finding holiday gifts. Food is a great gift, especially for people you don’t know very well or just want to give a small token of appreciation (teachers, coworkers, etc). My mom and I often prepared small bags of almond roca or other goodies for my teachers all through middle school, and she still prepares platters of almond roca, spritz, clothespin cookies, or other treats for family friends and business associates.

Grandma's Chocolate Fudge {{Baking Bytes}}

My grandma always made this fudge every Christmas, although she also always put walnuts in it. Delicious chocolatey fudge surrounding silly crunchy walnuts. Clearly I don’t care for nuts in fudge (or really much of anything besides almond roca) and so I have omitted them from this recipe. Feel free to add them back in if that’s your style.

Grandma's Chocolate Fudge {{Baking Bytes}}

Fudge seems to go over well with most people and so is routinely included in our line-up. This recipe is based off my grandmother’s recipe, as is probably obvious by the name. It has taken a little bit of research to get it right as the her recipe specified two packages of this and a package of that, and the size of “packages” have changed quite drastically over the last few decades. Nonetheless, we prevailed and have come up with the one below.

Grandma's Chocolate Fudge {{Baking Bytes}}

Last year we hand-stirred the recipe, as is tradition, and not only was it an immense amount of work but we had to enlist my dad to finish the job. We have changed the proportions a bit so it might be manageable for one of less than Herculean arm strength, but in spite of that I still opted to use my stand mixer. It worked beautifully and is much, much less effort to get that velvety chocolate experience you’re looking for. But if you’re looking for a workout while you make piles of decadent treats this season, feel free to stir by hand.

Grandma's Chocolate Fudge {{Baking Bytes}}

Grandma also used margarine instead of butter, I imagine largely because it was cheaper. I’ve made it both ways and honestly I can’t much tell the difference with regards to flavor, but the batch made with margarine turned out a decent amount softer. I imagine this is mostly because margarine has a lower melting temperature, but beating in an extra couple minutes could help too. I personally don’t like a sticky fudge so I put that batch in the freezer, which makes it perfect in my mind. Choose your own adventure here, or just use whatever you have on hand – it’ll be delicious regardless.

Grandma’s Chocolate Fudge

Adapted from my grandmother’s recipe
Makes a lot

Ingredients

2 cups chocolate chips
2 sticks (1 cup total) salted butter, each cut into fourths
20 large marshmallows
2 T vanilla

4 cups sugar
12 oz can evaporated milk

Directions

  1. Line a baking dish or lipped cookie sheet with aluminum foil. Set aside.2
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add chocolate chips, margarine or butter, marshmallows, and vanilla1. Set aside. You must do this before boiling the milk otherwise it’ll cool down too much and won’t mix completely.
  3. In a medium-large saucepan, whisk together sugar and evaporated milk (make sure you have a fair amount of extra space, it’ll grow).
  4. Over medium-high heat, bring milk mixture to full rolling boil, stirring often.
  5. Continue to boil for 6 minutes (I recommend setting a timer), stirring constantly.
  6. Add hot milk mixture to remaining ingredients (don’t scrape the pot too vigorously or you will end up with sugar crystals in your fudge), and beat on low with the normal beater attachment (or by hand) for at least 5 minutes (again, set a timer), until marshmallows are completely dissolved. Scrape sides every minute or two during this time to ensure an even mix.
  7. Pour into foil-lined pan, smooth out the top, and let cool completely. An unheated garage or porch if you don’t have fridge space is great for speeding up this process.
  8. Remove from foil and cut into cubes. I suggest moving it to a cutting board or you will have many small squares of foil to peel off later.
  9. Package as desired and give as much of it away as possible so you don’t eat it all.

Notes

If you like, you can add up to two cups chopped nuts or hard candy. Personally I do not like uneven texture in fudge or baked goods, but it’s certainly an option if you’re into it.

I like to use a cookie sheet so the fudge is a little thinner, but either will work. It may not fill a whole sheet so line it with foil and make a new edge about halfway, making sure you have extra foil sticking up. After you pour it in and start to spread it, you can adjust the edge to hold more or less fudge as necessary to keep it the right thickness.

Coffee Fudge Ripple Ice Cream {National Ice Cream Month}

[Welcome! In case you missed it, this month is National Ice Cream month. Each Wednesday I am sharing a new ice cream recipe for the entire month of July. If you missed the first three recipes, they can be found herehere, and here.]

If you’re not a coffee drinker, you probably just want to skip this one. But if you do like coffee, then boy do I have the recipe for you.

Coffee ice cream is actually something I’ve been ruminating on for quite a while, but wasn’t quite ready to take the plunge. I am not fond of the way instant coffee tastes and I wasn’t thrilled at the idea of buying yet another extract. Obviously the ground coffee I already buy was the answer, but it seemed like a more intimidating adventure than I was prepared for so I put it off for several months. However, the heat wave we had in June reminded me of iced coffee, which reminded me of coffee ice cream, which inspired me to peruse Pinterest for methods.

Coffee Fudge Ripple Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

While instant coffee was by far the most common, I immediately wrote off any recipes that employed it. I saw several that brewed coffee milk as the first step, which seemed promising, so I decided to give it ago. Since I typically use half and half in my recipes, that’s what I tried first. Unfortunately it was too thick for the coffee to brew well, and was nearly impossible to squeeze out of the grounds without breaking the coffee filters.

Coffee Fudge Ripple Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

Take 2: Whole milk. This worked fabulously and was surprisingly easy. One of my batches I accidentally left brewing closer to an hour. This made it incredibly strong but since I like strong flavors, I was thrilled with this outcome. Feel free to taste test yours at the 30-minute mark and maybe leave it in a little longer if it tastes too weak to you. Bear in mind, however, that it’ll taste somewhat stronger once it’s in ice cream form. This seems counter-intuitive but it’s the experience I had so I thought I would pass on the knowledge.

Coffee Fudge Ripple Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

By itself, this recipe tastes like an extra creamy, rather sweeter latte. Very smooth and absolutely fabulous on its own, but for visual interest and to go a bit more the mocha route, I added a small chocolate ripple to my batches. This is absolutely not necessary but it is extremely delicious, so I included the recipe and method for this below. Long-time readers will recognize it from last year’s Peanut Butter Fudge Ripple recipe. Add more or less chocolate to suit your preferences, or just make the recipe to use as a topping on the fly.

Coffee Fudge Ripple Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

As a note, I found this recipe froze harder due to its lower fat and sugar than my usual concoction. To combat this, I added a little Kahlúa to my recipe. This is 100% optional but makes the ice cream much easier to dish straight out of the freezer as well as kicking up the coffee flavor a notch. You could also use vodka if you don’t want any added flavor, or basically any alcohol or liqueur of your choice. Baileys or vanilla would be a great addition if you want to switch up the experience a bit.

Chocolate-covered espresso beans make for a lovely, crunchy topping, as well as giving people a hint to the flavor they’re about to enjoy.

Coffee Fudge Ripple Ice Cream {{Baking Bytes}}

If for some reason you’re not a coffee fan but have still made it this far into the post, make sure you check back next week for a totally different taste experience.

Coffee Ice Cream 

Makes ~6 cups

Ingredients

1 cup whole milk (not half and half; 2% is okay if you must)
1/2 cup ground coffee

3/4 cup sugar
2 cups heavy whipping cream
1/2 cup egg substitute
1-2 Tbsp alcohol, optional

Directions

  1. Place coffee in a sealed coffee filter, cheesecloth, etc. so the grounds don’t get in your ice cream. I used a clip to keep a regular coffee filter closed around the grounds, using one filter per 1/4 cup of coffee.
  2. In a small saucepan, heat milk on medium until it just starts to boil, then remove from heat. Place coffee (in filter!) in the milk and allow to steep for about at least 30 minutes. Remove coffee (and any escaped grounds), squeezing grounds gently to release the most flavorful milk.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together remaining ingredients with coffee milk until completely combined.
  4. Cover bowl and chill in the refrigerator at least 8 hours, or overnight.
  5. Freeze according to your ice cream maker’s directions, then place in a freezer-safe bowl to freeze for an additional three hours, or overnight. Or follow fudge ripple ice cream recipe below.
  6. Top with chocolate-covered espresso beans for some extra flair and a little crunch.

Notes

1 You could use decaf if you’re concerned about the caffeine at night, I used it in my second batch and it was just great. Regardless of caffeine content, pick a coffee you like to drink since the flavor is very prominent.

I found that with the reduced fat and sugar from my usual recipe the ice cream froze a lot harder. The easiest way to fix this is to add alcohol, so that’s what I did. I used 2 Tbsp of Kahlúa which not only kicked up the coffee flavor an extra notch, but made it possible to dish the ice cream straight out of the freezer. If you’re using straight alcohol (e.g. vodka) 1 Tbsp is probably enough, if you’re using a liqueur (e.g. Kahlúa, Baileys) then the full two is probably better. Or, add up to 1/4 cup if you want the added flavoring to shine through.

Fudge Ripple

Borrowed from Brown Eyed Baker
Makes 1+ cups1

Ingredients

½ cup sugar
1/3 cup light corn syrup
½ cup water
6 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder2

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan, whisk together all ingredients except vanilla. Cook over medium heat, whisking often, until the sauce comes to a low boil.
  2. Continue cooking for another minute, whisking almost continuously.
  3. Remove sauce from the heat, stir in the vanilla, and let cool in the pot for several minutes.
  4. Chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before using in ice cream.

Notes

The quantity varies depending on cooking time, in my experience. I used about 1/2 cup in my ice cream and put the rest in the fridge to use later. You can also freeze it but you may need to take it out for a bit before it becomes pourable.

The original recipe calls for Dutch-processed cocoa powder but I just used Hershey’s because that’s what I always have on hand. I used one tablespoon dark cocoa powder and the rest regular.

Fudge Ripple Ice Cream

Ingredients

1 recipe ice cream of choice, chilled but not churned
1 recipe of fudge ripple (above), chilled

Directions

  1. If you haven’t already, place a freezer-safe bowl in the freezer.
  2. Freeze ice cream according to your ice cream maker’s directions.
  3. Remove bowl from freezer, and drizzle some chocolate sauce on the bottom.
  4. Gently spread about one cup of ice cream into the bowl, and top with another drizzle of chocolate sauce. Avoid stirring or the ice cream will look muddy. Repeat with remaining ice cream (you may have sauce leftover), finishing with a sauce drizzle on top. Pro tip: end with just a small drizzle on top or it could mix together once the lid is on.
  5. Return bowl to freezer for about 3 hours, or until ice cream is firm.