Cold Brewed Coffee: Served Hot

[Welcome to this month’s Cold Brewed Coffee Series! If you missed the first post on making your own cold brew concentrate, you can find it here.]

I feel a bit silly even posting this as a recipe because it’s so easy and so short, but as something I make almost every day I definitely want to share it with all of you. For me, I love starting the day with a hot beverage and even in the heat of summer I nearly always have a hot cup of coffee first thing in the morning.

Because of this, the main reason it took me so long to board the cold brew train is because I am much less inclined to drink cold coffee, especially first thing in the morning. Realistically it’s all about the ritual; I could likely start with a plain cup of hot water and be almost as happy. Almost.

One benefit to drinking my own cold brew is that it’s one of the few times I prefer coffee black. I managed to wean myself off of sweetened coffee quite awhile ago, but ditching the splash of cream has proven more challenging. I still like it in most drip coffee (especially at restaurants), but at home I enjoy this cold brewed coffee in it’s unadorned state.

So since coffee is delicious and cold brewed coffee is even better, here’s how I make my concentrate into a piping hot beverage each morning. Hope you enjoy it!

PS – I also use this for my bulletproof coffee2 on running days, simply add a bulletproof pod, blend it up, and you’re all set! Optionally add a scoop of protein powder for a nice boost for those tough morning workouts.

Cold Brewed Coffee: Served Hot

Makes 10-12 oz

Ingredients

2-3 oz cold brew concentrate
7-10 oz boiling water1

Directions

  1. Pour cold brew concentrate into a mug, then stream in boiling water.
  2. Optionally supplement with your preferred garnishes (sugar, cream, etc).
  3. Enjoy!

Notes

I nearly always do 2 oz concentrate to 8 oz boiling water, mostly because my favorite mugs are 10 oz, but this will depend on how long you let yours brew and how strong you like your coffee.

For the bulletproof version I like a little stronger coffee so I typically do the following: 1 pod, 3 oz coffee,  and 9 oz boiling water. Blend for 5-10 seconds or until frothy. Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 scoop of protein powder as well if I’m heading out for a longer or tougher workout. (Be careful though, some powders froth more excessively than others and might overwhelm a personal-sized blender cup.)

Cold Brew Coffee 101 (Series!)

Happy July! In addition to my usual series for National Ice Cream Month, I am also bringing to you a simple series on cold brew coffee: how to make it and ways to use it. The recipes will be quick but I hope they will become staples in your future! Check back each Wednesday for a quick coffee endeavor, and follow up on Friday with the latest ice cream adventure. Hope you enjoy!

About two years ago I discovered the glorious world of cold brew coffee. Admittedly, I took forever to board the train for this latest fad largely because I don’t drink a ton of iced coffee and even to this day I always see cold brew served cold, especially in restaurants. If you, too, have been skeptical on the awesomeness of this adventure, I am here to entice you into joining. It feels a bit silly posting something so easy as a 4-part series, but hopefully what I’ve learned along the way makes it that much easier for you to get started.

Cold Brew Coffee 101 {{Baking Bytes}}

For years I have rarely consumed more than one cup of coffee per day, possibly two on some truly exhausting occasions. Since M is not a coffee fan, making standard drip coffee for one started to feel inefficient and wasteful. Resigning to try this fancy shmancy cold brew thing, I gave it a shot.

As it turned out, I *loved* that coffee. No bitterness, extremely smooth, and with the discovery that I could make a super strong concentrate and combine it with boiling water for my usual hot morning beverage, I finally boarded the cold brew coffee train. However, the process was messy, time-consuming, and honestly just kind of exhausting. Coffee filters were too small to use in the quantities I was making, and straining the ground afterwards through paper towels and coffee filters was tedious and slow and not something I wanted to do every couple of weeks.

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After trying a mesh filter for my pitchers with mediocre results1 (it didn’t have great circulation, and I still had to strain out the silty texture), I discovered my new best friend: the CoffeeSock. With stellar reviews and a pretty inexpensive price, I quickly ordered one to try out. Nearly two years later, it’s still a perfect fit.

Easy, reusable, perfectly strained, and consistently delicious results make this one of the best things I’ve ever bought. It takes only a few minutes active time to set a batch brewing, and even less to finish the process a few days later. I love that there’s no disposable waste and that it doesn’t allow a strange texture to seep through the cloth. And, of course, it makes great tasting coffee.

Cold Brew Coffee 101 {{Baking Bytes}}

If you’re interested in cold brew I highly recommend this product, and for ease of pouring later these silicon jar lids are fantastic. They make it way easier to pour out of the large jar and keep everything nice and fresh for as long as it lasts in your fridge. For me, this size batch typically lasts about 3 weeks so I can vouch for freshness for at least that long.

Cold Brew Coffee 101 {{Baking Bytes}}

Using cold brew is pretty straightforward but just for fun I’m going to split my favorites out into their own posts. Get a batch brewing in your fridge then check back next Wednesday for my most-used “recipe”!

PS – I don’t get anything if you purchase those products; I just really love them!

Cold Brew Coffee 101

Makes about 1.5 quarts

Ingredients

6 oz ground coffee (about 2 cups, regular drip grind or slight coarser)
Cold water

Suggested Equipment

2-quart CoffeeSock Kit
Brew Armor lid

Directions

  1. Drape a CoffeeSock over the edge of your Mason jar and fill with 6 oz of ground coffee.
  2. Slowly stream cold water through the grounds until the jar is full. Do not try to do this quickly, just let it slowly soak through the coffee.
  3. Tie off the CoffeeSock (or cheesecloth) so the grounds stay contained, then put the lid on the Mason jar.
  4. Place in the fridge for 2-4 days, I like to put a sticky note with the date I started brewing onto the jar. Occasionally flip the jar upside down to better circulate the water inside.
  5. When coffee has reached your desired strength (I usually do around 3 days, sometimes as many as 5 depending on how full life is at the moment), remove the CoffeeSock from the jar and squeeze to get as much of that extra strength coffee back into your jar as you can.
  6. Discard grounds into the trash (or your garden), thoroughly rinse the cloth, and hang to dry.
  7. Return coffee to fridge until ready to enjoy. Recommend a Brew Armor lid or similar for easy pouring!

Notes

Works great for sun tea though!

DIY Hot Chocolate Mix

Perhaps the quintessential cold-weather beverage, hot chocolate has long been a favorite of mine. I drink it much less often as an adult since I prefer to eat my calories rather than drink them, but on a cold and snowy day, hot chocolate is still a delicious way to warm up. These days I find most of the store-bought mixes to be far too sweet, and so I set out to make my own.

All the popular Pinterest items used non-fat milk powder, so I gave that a shot. I had reservations on how well this would work because it’s the milk fat that makes proper hot chocolate into the creamy delight we look for. As expected, the non-fat versions tasted far too watery to me. I knew I wanted to include milk powder since the goal was not to have to heat up milk every time I wanted a cup, and so I checked to see if whole milk powder was a thing that exists.

Helpful, Amazon has my back and I promptly ordered what I presume is basically a lifetime supply. Fortunately it is shelf-stable for quite a while (or you can freeze it) so I had no qualms about order it. After a couple iterations to get the cocoa:sugar ratio down, I landed on my perfect concoction. Not too sweet, very chocolatey, and pleasantly creamy without the hassle of heating milk or the requirement to have a splash of heavy cream on hand. (We almost always do, but I realize the average person does not buy heavy whipping cream by the half-gallon.)

This recipe easily scales, so you can make less for a small amount or scale it up and give it away as gifts. Add a cute jar and a tag with instructions and you have a wonderful small token of appreciation. It keeps for at least 6 months (that’s how long my batch lasted) so you can stock up for the season ahead. All the convenience of those pre-made mixes and the ability to tailor the amount of sugar to your preferences; a win-win if you ask me.

DIY Hot Chocolate Mix

Makes about 8 servings

Ingredients

for mix
3/4 cup whole milk powder
1/2 cup dutch process cocoa powder (regular works okay too)
1/2 cup + 2 Tablespoons sugar2

to prepare hot chocolate
12 oz boiling water
3-4 Tablespoons mix

Directions

  1. For the mix: whisk together milk powder, cocoa powder, and sugar until well combined. Store in an airtight container.
  2. For hot chocolate: Add 3-4 tablespoons mix to the bottom of a large mug.
  3. Pour in 1-2 ounces of boiling water, and mix until well combined. (A handheld milk frother works great for this.)
  4. Pour in remaining boiling water, and continue to mix until completely combined.
  5. Enjoy immediately with your favorite toppings. (And a splash of Baileys, for the adults.)

Notes

You must use whole milk powder, the non-fat stuff is useless. Whole milk powder is the key to creaminess without having to heat milk every time you want to prepare a cup of hot chocolate.

I prefer my hot chocolate a little less on the sweet side; if you like yours more like a store-bought version, use 3/4 -1 cup sugar .

Blackberry Peach Smoothie

Although I mostly stick with my go-to peanut butter and banana smoothie, I occasionally am interested in a more summery flavor profile. Typically I concoct one from whatever happens to be my in freezer at the time, which is usually a mixture of bananas, berries, and melons, and maybe a cucumber or two. Blackberries are far and above my favorite berry but as they are quite strong in flavor I like to pair them with something a bit more mild. Bananas are excellent for this, of course, but in late summer peaches are easily my ideal complement.

This is another excellent smoothie for any time of day, an equally delicious way to start your day as it is to end it. With plenty of fresh fruit and a hidden veggie boost, its flavor is reminiscent of a cobbler but much lower in sugar. The spinach muddies the color a bit, but otherwise it’s not even noticeable. Ground oatmeal makes a nice thickener as well as keeping you fuller longer, and my trusty dash of cinnamon rounds it out nicely. If you prefer yours a bit sweeter, add a dollop of pure maple syrup.

It’s not necessary to peel your peaches before freezing them, but make sure they are in small enough chunks to fit in your blender. I typically cut mine into eighths since that’s the easiest way to pit them anyway. Slice and pit a whole tray at once and then arrange on a piece of parchment paper to freeze. Once frozen you can transfer them to a Ziploc or other storage without fear of them sticking into one giant clump of peach. I use this method to freeze all my fruits and veggies for smoothies (and oatmeal) – everything from sliced bananas and berries to cucumber and zucchini. It takes a little prep time, but it’s well worth the convenience later.

Sweet peaches and tart blackberries come together in combination perfect for those later days of summer when both are overly abundant. Whether you’re buying from Costco or local stand, or lucky enough to be picking them yourself, it’s a delicious way to use up excess fruits that are maybe a little beyond the raw-eating prime. With these last few weeks of toasty weather ahead, you should have ample time to give this a whirl.

Blackberry Peach Smoothie
Makes one 16-20 oz smoothie

Ingredients

1/3 cup oatmeal

1 ripe peach (pitted, sliced, and frozen)1
1/4 cup blackberries, frozen
1 – 1.5 cups coconut milk (or any unsweetened milk)

1 – 2 cups frozen and crushed baby spinach
1-2 tsp maple syrup (optional)
cinnamon, to taste

Directions

  1. Place oatmeal in blender (I like to use the single-serve size so I don’t accidentally make a gigantic smoothie) and blend until finely ground.
  2. Add remaining ingredients (optionally reserving a peach slice and two berries for garnish) and blend until completely mixed (this could take a minute or so). If it’s too thick, blend in additional milk one tablespoon at a time until desired consistency is reached.
  3. Enjoy immediately with a straw, a sunny day, and a good book.

Notes

1  I typically slice mine into roughly eighths as they fit into my single-serving blender cup better that way. You can slice yours more or less to suit your needs.

I like to put a bunch in the freezer and then crush it all once it’s frozen. Then it’s really easy to measure out a cup or two for each smoothie on the fly.

Race Day Smoothie

About five years ago I discovered my favorite green smoothie, which I basically lived on during an extremely hot and smokey summer in Helena. I was admittedly liberal with the peanut butter and a bit light on the spinach, but overall it was a decently healthy dinner option for those days I didn’t want to eat anything warmer than ice.

Over the years I’ve lightened up my original recipe, opting for coconut or almond milk instead of cow’s and substituting PBFit peanut butter powder instead of the real deal. Peanut butter powder may sound silly, but in baking or smoothies I actually prefer it over the original. The peanut flavor is a bit more concentrated and it really lowers the amount of calories and fat. I’m not a calorie counter by any means, but it makes it much easier to create a snack-sized version while keeping all that wonderful peanut flavor.  I’ve also probably doubled the amount of spinach I use, since I’m now inclined to add it to almost anything from smoothies to soup to scrambled eggs, and it’s definitely my preferred salad base. The spinach only vaguely modifies the flavor but gives a big nutrient boost – presuming you don’t mind the crazy green color. I admit it’s a bit off-putting to the uninitiated but I’m so used to it that this smoothie without spinach now looks and tastes strange to me.

During the summer and fall I participate in tons of running events, where you have to get up stupid early in the morning in order to make it to the start line or bus pickup on time. My usual race day breakfast (or really any day breakfast) is oatmeal with banana and PBFit, but on the days it’s too hot for that I opt for this smoothie instead. They contain basically the same ingredients, with the smoothie having that extra spinach boost. It goes down much easier when it’s already 75 degrees or more, and takes just as little time to prep in the morning.

I like to pre-grind the oatmeal so there aren’t large chunks clogging up my straws, but it’s not strictly necessary if you have a really quality blender. The oatmeal not only adds some calories and makes the smoothie more filling, but I really enjoy the hearty flavor it adds to the palate. It’s not overwhelming but reminiscent of an oatmeal cookie, and is still pleasant for people who necessarily enjoy oatmeal on its own.

This smoothie tastes like a peanut butter banana milkshake but is a much healthier way to start the day. With the addition of oatmeal it sticks with you for quite a while, making it perfect for both pre-race and post-race. It’s also a pretty legit dinner for those days you’re feeling lazy or in a hurry but still want something on the healthy end of the spectrum, and your boyfriend isn’t around to insist smoothies are not a real dinner.

Race Day Smoothie
Makes one 16-20 oz smoothie

Ingredients

1/3 cup oatmeal

1 ripe banana (peeled, sliced, and frozen)2
1 – 1.5 cups coconut milk (or any unsweetened milk)
2 Tbsp PBFit
1+ cups frozen and crushed baby spinach
cinnamon, to taste

Directions

  1. Place oatmeal in blender (I like to use the single-serve size so I don’t accidentally make a gigantic smoothie) and blend until finely ground.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and blend until completely mixed (this could take a minute or so). If it’s too thick, blend in additional milk 2 tablespoons at a time until desired consistency is reached.
  3. Enjoy immediately with a straw, a sunny day, and a good book.

Notes

1  For a lighter smoothie I just leave out the oatmeal; this is great for the days you want a lighter breakfast or a healthier snack/dessert later in the day. But for an entrée smoothie the oatmeal adds great flavor and makes it a lot more filling!

2  I typically slice mine into roughly eighths as they fit into my single-serving blender cup better that way. You can slice yours more or less to suit your needs.

I like to put a bunch in the freezer and then crush it all once it’s frozen. Then it’s really easy to measure out a cup or two for each smoothie on the fly.